Posts Tagged ‘conflict’

Political Posturing is Not a Charities Job

The organisations listed below or their representatives have collaborated or even colluded in ‘Brexit politics’ at a sensitive time. They jointly signed a letter published in the Daily Telegraph on 31st December 2018 copy below.

Campaigning charities have the right or even obligation to speak out but only after due consideration. Such a considered policy needs to have full approval within the organisation and logically should relate to current circumstance  rather than matters that are still uncertain. Members of charitable organisations and donors have the right to expect balanced views from their charity or risk alienation of a significant proportion of the stakeholders. This particular letter is emotive and the conclusions drawn are by no means certain.

The Signatories

Mike Clarke RSPB     Stephanie Hilborne The Wildlife Trusts   Beccy Speight Woodland Trust     Shaun Spiers Green Alliance     Crispin Truman Campaign to Protect Rural England    John Sauven Greenpeace   Martin Spray Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust   Craig Bennett Friends of the Earth   James Thornton ClientEarth   Sandy Luk Marine Conservation Society   Nick Mabey E3G    Dr Michael Warhurst CHEM Trust   Helen Browning  Soil Association

SIR – No one who loves Britain’s beautiful countryside, or cares about our environment more generally, should be in any doubt about the disastrous impact of a no-deal Brexit.

We can expect traffic chaos, with the garden of England turning into the lorry park of England. Dangerous chemicals will go unmonitored. Farmers will face huge uncertainty, with high tariffs on exports and livestock stuck at borders. And we will immediately lose the institutions that have ensured cleaner rivers and beaches, and safeguarded important habitats for wildlife.

The Government has promised a “green Brexit”. That depends on continued cooperation with the EU and a mutual commitment to the highest environmental standards. No deal is not an option for a greener UK. (Our highlights)

Opinion and Action

  • I will not renew my membership of some of these organisations
  • I am actively reviewing my support for the other causes signed up to this letter. Those who emphasis ‘doing’ good will be favoured over those who talk an ill timed fight.
  • I will continue to advocate that charities avoid controversial involvement in politics even when I am sympathetic to the underlying issues.

Burma Looking for Salvation

The United Nations Security Council met on 30 August 2017 to discuss the humanitarian crisis in Rakhine State, Burma (Mayanmar). Nothing new about conflicts in Mayanmar. This latest crisis follows a  military offensive against civilians in Rakhine State. This time it is not The Salvation Army we know and love but an armed group known as the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army who are involved in the unrest.

Various UK charities are trying to ‘do their bit’ for Burma.

1. CHRISTIAN SOLIDARITY INTERNATIONAL 281836
‘This charity is ‘working for religious freedom through advocacy and human rights, in the pursuit of justice.’ Christian Solidarity is calling for international action to tackle the crisis in Mayanmar, including measures such as targeted sanctions and the suspension of British training for the Burmese Army.
2. PENNY APPEAL 1128341
According to their latest funding appeal ‘close to 75,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to neighbouring Bangladesh following violence in Mayanmar.  The number is rising. They need your help, fast.

Treated worse than animals, this dehumanisation of the Rohingya people has become ethnic cleansing in Myanmar. Human rights violations and destruction are rife, with women raped, children abused and villages burned to the ground. There is a mass exodus from the country as people flee for their lives, facing perilous journeys to do so. Dozens of refugees, including children, are missing and presumed dead, as Rohingya Muslims were forced to risk everything to escape this brutal persecution.’

3. KIDZ IN KAMPZ 1096118
Kidz in Kampz is still helping another oppressed minority from Mayanmar, the Karen people. Traditionally Karen people practised Animism (spirit worship) and  Buddhism. This smaller charity provides hands on service delivery on  projects such as  ′The School of Hope′ a school for children with special needs  located in Nupo camp. This refugee camp is  on the Thai border where the Committee for Coordination of Services to Displaced Persons in Thailand (CCSDPT)   focus on working with displaced persons from Burma.

 Comment

The above illustrations show three ways UK charities make an impact, via advocacy, by fund raising and providing service delivery. Choose your preferred method of helping those causes close to your own aspirations.